Constitutional Money

Disclosures & References

This website contains forward-looking statements and uncertain factors. These statements are not based on historical fact but relate to King Dollar Money Limited and King Dollar Trust future activities and performance.

They include statements about future strategies and anticipated benefits of these strategies.

These statements are subject to risks and uncertainties.

Actual results may differ substantially from those stated in any forward-looking statement. This is due to a number of factors, including King Dollar Money Limited and King Dollar Trust may decide not to implement these strategies and the possibility that the anticipated benefits of implemented strategies are not achieved.

King Dollar Money Limited assumes no obligation to update or revise information included in this website domain.

References:

  1. upma.org

  2. https://steemit.com/introduceyourself/@dantheman/daniel-larimer--co-founder-of-bitshares-steemit

  3. Statutory imperative that the U.S. Treasury produce silver legal tender coin in quantities “sufficient to meet public demand” 31 U.S.C.A. § 5112(e) & (i)(1).

  4. The IRS has stated that it may not push the application of the rule to the “coffee” level, but wherever the lines will be drawn, it will undoubtedly still pose transaction-tracking problems.

  5. 31 USC § 5103.

  6. 31 USC § 5112(h).

  7. United States Constitution, Article 1 §10 cl. 4.

  8. Utah Code Annotated (UCA) § 59-1-1501, et seq.

  9. Oklahoma Statutes § 62-4500.

  10. Arizona Revised Statutes Annotated § 43-1121, et seq.

  11. Colorado Revised Statutes Annotated § 11-61-101; Vernon's Annotated Missouri Statutes § 408.010.

  12. 31 U.S.C. §§ 5103 & 5112.

  13. 31 U.S.C. § 5119(a). Significantly, this statutory mandate invokes the market test of “purchasing power”, not merely parity of nominal face value. To this end, Congress has provided the secretary with a variety of statutory tools. These include the directive to buy and sell precious metals from the country’s reserves (Id.) as well as the requirement that all proceeds from the sale of gold be used “for the sole purpose of reducing the national debt.” 31 U.S.C. § 5116(2) (Reagan’s Golden Rule).

  14. Crummey v. Klien, 295 Fed.Appx. 625 (5th Cir. 2008), following Thompson v. Butler, 95 U.S. 694 (Supreme Ct. 1877).

  15. 31 U.S.C.A. § 5116(2).

  16. 31 U.S.C.A. § 5112(e) & (i)(1).

  17. Greenspan, Alan. Capitalism, the Unknown Ideal, 1967.

  18. Griffin, G. Edward. The Creature From Jekyll Island, American Media, 2010, p. 312.

  19. 31 U.S.C.A. § 5112(e) & (i)(1).

  20. 31 U.S.C. § 5119(a). Significantly, this statutory mandate invokes the market test of “purchasing power”, not merely parity of nominal face value. To this end, Congress has provided the Secretary with a variety of statutory tools. These include the directive to buy and sell precious metals from the country’s reserves (Id.) as well as the requirement that all proceeds from the sale of gold be used “for the sole purpose of reducing the national debt.” 31 U.S.C. § 5116(2) (Reagan’s Golden Rule).

  21. Crummey v. Klein, 295 Fed.Appx. 625, 627 (5th Cir. 2008).

  22. Thompson v. Butler, 95 U.S. 694 (1877).

  23. See, Rev. Rul. 68-634, 1968-2 CB 46; Rev.Rul. 78-360, 1978-2 C.B. 228; Cordner, 45 AFTR2d 80-1677 (DC Calif., 1980); California Federal Life Insurance Co. v. Commissioner of Internal Revenue, 680 F.2d 85 (9th Cir. 1982), affg. 76 T.C. 107 (1981); Joslin v. United States, 666 F.2d 1306 (10th Cir. 1981), affg. 1981 WL 186; Cordner v. United States, 671 F.2d 367 (9th Cir. 1982); Lary v. Commissioner of Internal Revenue, 842 F.2d 296 (11th Cir. 1988).

  24. Smith v. Commissioner of Internal Revenue, T.C. Memo. 1998-148 and United States v. Kahre, 2007 WL 1521064.

  25. Thorne and Wilson v. Utah State Tax Commission, 681 P.2d 1237, 1239 (Utah 1984).

  26. Ibid. at 1239.

  27. 26 USCA §6702.

  28. 31 USC § 5116(2).

  29. 31 USC §§ 5112(e)(i)(1) & 5116 (a)(3)